Obituaries

Robin Smith
D: 2018-04-14
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Smith, Robin
Natalie Zinn
D: 2018-04-13
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Zinn, Natalie
Rhoda Bennett
D: 2018-04-08
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Bennett, Rhoda
Gertrude Kessler
D: 2018-04-07
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Kessler, Gertrude
Arlene Rosenberg
D: 2018-04-05
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Rosenberg, Arlene
Gerald Fleishman
D: 2018-03-27
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Fleishman, Gerald
Gail Salinsky
D: 2018-03-14
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Salinsky, Gail
Morris Sier
D: 2018-03-08
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Sier, Morris
Ethel Reiss
D: 2018-03-07
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Reiss, Ethel
Fanny Glassman
D: 2018-03-07
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Glassman, Fanny
Dorothy Levine
D: 2018-03-05
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Levine, Dorothy
Alan Rubin
D: 2018-02-27
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Rubin, Alan
Charlotte Podrid
D: 2018-02-25
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Podrid, Charlotte
Esther Spector
D: 2018-02-20
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Spector, Esther
Sally Price
D: 2018-02-20
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Price, Sally
Eileen Edelstein
D: 2018-02-19
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Edelstein, Eileen
Harriet Mitgang
D: 2018-02-19
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Mitgang, Harriet
Miriam Ginsberg
D: 2018-02-17
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Ginsberg, Miriam
Cynthia Richter
D: 2018-02-16
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Richter, Cynthia
Lillian Karp
D: 2018-02-16
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Karp, Lillian
Inez Silverstein
D: 2018-02-14
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Silverstein, Inez

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Understanding Grief

You may not be understanding how you or a family or friend is feeling now that a loved one is gone. We hope this section of our website will help you understand the grieving process. If you have any questions or would prefer to speak to someone directly, please contact us.

 


 

What is Grief?

"Grief is reaching out for someone who's always been there, only to find when you need them the most, one last time, they're gone."

The death of a loved one is life's most painful event. People's reactions to death remain one of society's least understood and most off-limits topics for discussion. Oftentimes, grievers are left totally alone in dealing with their pain, loneliness, and isolation.

Grief is a natural emotion that follows death. It hurts. Sadness, denial, guilt, physical discomfort, and sleeplessness are some of the symptoms of grief. It is like an open wound which must become healed. At times, it seems as if this healing will never happen. While some of life's spontaneity begins to return, it never seems to get back to the way it was. It is still incomplete. We know, however, that these feelings of being incomplete can disappear.

Healing is a process of allowing ourselves to feel, experience, and accept the pain. In other words, we give ourselves permission to heal. Allowing ourselves to accept these feelings is the beginning of that process.

The healing process can take much less time than we have been led to believe. There are two missing parts. One is a safe, loving, professionally guided atmosphere in which to express our feelings; the other is knowing how and what to communicate.

 

Grief and Healing

When we experience a major loss, grief is the normal and natural way our mind and body react. Everyone grieves differently. And at the same time there are common patterns people tend to share.

For example, someone experiencing grief usually moves through a series of emotional stages, such as shock, numbness, guilt, anger and denial. And physical responses are typical also. They can include: sleeplessness, inability to eat or concentrate, lack of energy, and lack of interest in activities previously enjoyed.

Time always plays an important role in grief and healing. As the days, weeks and months go by, the person who is experiencing loss moves through emotional and physical reactions that normally lead toward acceptance, healing and getting on with life as fully as possible.

Sometimes a person can become overwhelmed or bogged down in the grieving process. Serious losses are never easy to deal with, but someone who is having trouble beginning to actively re-engage in life after a few months should consider getting professional help. For example, if continual depression or physical symptoms such as loss of appetite, inability to sleep, or chronic lack of energy persists, it is probably time to see a doctor.

 

Grief Counseling 

There has been an ever-increasing desire to expand traditional roles beyond "at-need" and "pre-need" services into "after-need" or post funeral services for the bereaved. As such, we provide bereavement services for the families we serve. We can also provide you with Jewish Mourning and be more specific and answer all your questions speicifc to your Faith and Traditions.